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Mount Everest

 
   
 
Mount Everest is the highest mountain on Earth, as measured by the height above sea level of its summit, 8,848 metres (29,029 feet). The mountain, which is part of the Himalaya range in Asia, is located on the border between Sagarmatha Zone, Nepal, and Tibet, China.
The northern approach to the mountain was discovered by George Mallory on the first expedition in 1921. The northern approach to the mountain was discovered by George Mallory on the first expedition in 1921. The British returned for a 1922 expedition.
George Finch climbed using oxygen for the first time. He ascended at a remarkable speed — 950 feet per hour, and reached an altitude of 8,320 metres (27,300 feet), the first time a human climbed higher than 8,000 metres. Access was closed from the north to western expeditions in 1950, after the Chinese asserted control over Tibet.
In 1950, Bill Tilman and a small party which included Charles Houston, Oscar Houston and Betsy Cowles undertook an exploratory expedition to Everest through Nepal along the route which has now become the standard approach to Everest from the south. In 1953, a ninth British expedition, led by John Hunt, returned to Nepal. Hunt selected two climbing pairs to attempt to reach the summit. The first pair (Tom Bourdillon and Charles Evans) came within 100 metres (300 feet) of the summit on 26 May 1953, but turned back after becoming exhausted. As planned, their work in route finding and breaking trail and their caches of extra oxygen were of great aid to the following pair. Two days later, the expedition made its second and final assault on the summit with its second climbing pair, the New Zealander Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay from Nepal. They reached the summit at 11:30 a.m. local time on May 29, 1953 via the South Col Route. At the time, both acknowledged it as a team effort by the whole expedition, but Tenzing revealed a few years later that Hillary had put his foot on the summit first

 
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